Positive White Cane

Fostering Well-Being

Designer: Thijs te Velde – TU Delft
Coaches: Pieter Desmet and Rebecca Price
Stakeholders: Visio, Margot Scheltema.

Positive White Cane

How can we positively serve communities with different needs?

Most products that visually impaired people use on a day-to-day basis are modified versions of products designed for sighted people. This project was inspired by the resilience and resourcefulness of visually impaired or partially sighted communities. The customizable cane incorporates a connected handle, which can be outfitted with modules developed in collaboration with non-sighted users by independent developers, health professionals, and organizations such as Visio. Since it also functions as a data gathering device, the connected cane helps professional ergo-therapists and city planners in their efforts to make the world more accessible for all.

Wearable Breathing Trainer

Fostering Well-Being

Designers: Geke Ludden, Lara Siering, Angelika Mader, Toms Bernhards, Hellen van Rees, Eliza Bottenberg, Boony Thio, Pascal Keijzer, Jean Driessen, Ben Bulsink – UTwente

Stakeholders: Fashion Designer Hellen van Rees, MST, OCON, Saxion University of Applied Sciences

Wearable Breathing Trainer

How can a product connect child, caretaker, and health worker?

A child with a respiratory disorder is often referred to a physical therapist who works with them to improve their breathing technique and educates them about self-assessment for dysfunctional breathing patterns. However, there is a lack of tools that can support children during breathing retraining, especially tools that can also guide and support caretakers and healthcare professionals in monitoring the long-term development of a child’s skills. This breathing trainer is made of robotic textile and equipped with sensor technology and LEDs, allowing it to detect and analyze respiratory disorders as well as provide real-time haptic and visual feedback during breathing retraining.

BagSight

Fostering Well-Being

Evert van Beek – TU Delft

Coaches: Dr. Marco Rozendaal (TU Delft), Prof. Catholijn Jonker (TU Delft) and Prof. Pim Haselager (Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen)

BagSight

How can products express guidance or intentions to us?

Taking inspiration from both guide dogs and the cybernetic concept of Braitenberg vehicles, BagSight is a research artifact exploring how designed objects can express their own intentions. By tightening its cord, this backpack moves on the back of the wearer during navigation of a city in order to express its feedback or desires. BagSight’s kinesthetic behaviour is designed in such a way that it can be seen as being afraid of obstacles (desiring to move away from them) and interested in moving towards a given goal. In a research study, participants described their experience of using BagSight as similar to an extension of their sensory organs, viewing it as both instrument and agent.

Interactive Dining Table

Fostering Well-Being

Interactive Dining Table

Can healthy behavior change cues be more subtle and social?

Eating is often a social activity. We sit together with friends, family, and colleagues to connect, share, and celebrate aspects of life. This interactive dining table is embedded with load cells and LED lights. The load cells are able to measure different aspects of eating behavior such as weight shifts around the table, collecting both individual data about dining behavior as well as social data about interactions between table members. Over the course of the meal, light signals from the table provide table members with feedback about their actions, give perspective regarding their eating choices, and cue more social dining behavior, all in the form of qualitative, expressive interactions.

OMNI

Fostering Well-Being

Designers: Michelle Sudjito, Anouk de Graaf, Connor Stork, Niels Kadijk, Sanne Metten, Anna van der Linden, Timo Petersen, Kai Ferdelman – UTwente
Coaches: Robby van Delden, Dennis Reidsma

OMNI

How can we make play more fun and fair for users with different needs?

This project began with the vision of creating a social game which is playable by everyone, including people with visual impairment. While there are many high-energy reaction games available, most are not playable by non-sighted or partially-sighted users as the feedback that players must react to often comes in a visual form. The game of OMNI does not involve sight, but instead gives feedback for players to react to in the form of different vibrations. Therefore, the game can be played by both sighted and visually impaired people, increasing interaction and connection.