Oh Crap I Gut my Future

Critical Changes

Sam Kragtwijk, Clarissa Schmitt – TU/e

Oh Crap I Gut my Future

Who are we in relation to our microbiome?

This project is a speculative design emphasizing the great influence that gut flora can have on different aspects of human life. Oh Crap I Gut My Future is a digital interface and care system for parents seeking to monitor and optimize the microbiome of their baby. How can parents collaborate with their children’s gut bacteria? What special “blend” of nutrients will give the best result? By centering the story around a baby, Oh Crap I Gut My Future seeks to educate about the link between gut flora and physical and mental abilities, as well as to push people out of their comfort zone and trigger deeper reflection on personalized healthcare, the quantified self, and self-optimization.

Mutual Understanding for Human-Machine Collaboration

Critical Changes

Designer: Emma van Zoelen – TU/e
Coach: Matthias Rauterberg
Stakeholder: Tessa Verhoef, Creative Intelligence Lab, Leiden University

 

 

Mutual Understanding for Human-Machine Collaboration

How will we collaborate with non-human intelligences?

As intelligent and adaptive systems gain more autonomy, they take over more responsibilities of people. Yet many aspects of complex task flows are still best performed by a human, meaning we’ll need to learn how to work together with non-human actors. In order to collaborate well, humans and machines, or ‘agents’ as they are referred to in AI research, must have nuanced ways to communicate. What if their objectives clash or come into tension? How can they negotiate shared decisions? This advanced design research project sets out to question the complex dynamics of human-machine interaction currently emerging in the growing AI field, asking what it will take to create more shared understandings.

Nuclear Sitdown

Critical Changes

Designer: David Claassen, Sem Lootsma – UTwente
Stakeholder: COVRA
Coaches: Deger Ozkaramanli, Bjorn de Koeijer 

Nuclear Sitdown

How can design open up complex conversations?

The designers of this project were curious to investigate perceptions of the nuclear industry. Their bold plan to create an object out of the controversial and negatively perceived material of nuclear waste immediately connected them to the Dutch radioactive waste management facility COVRA. In this installation, they play with the aesthetics of nuclear waste, creating an artifact to highlight our personal connection to waste. Their use of actual radioactive waste is meant to trigger a discussion about radioactivity in society. In the context of our evolving energy crisis, it is essential to take some nuanced looks into our perceptions of nuclear technologies, including aspects which may be highly emotional.

Designing Emotions That Last

Critical Changes

Designer: Deniz Söğütlü – TU Delft
Coaches: 
Prof. Pieter Desmet (TUDelft) , Prof. Anna Meroni (Politecnico di Milano)

 

Designing Emotions That Last

Can our emotional relationships with our products impact sustainability?

This design research project is an in-depth study on addressing the hyperconsumption of physical products by intervening in the emotional relationships we have with those products. A series of experimental design probes was created based on literature review and co-creative methods, with each probe exploring one of eight different qualities found to promote lasting emotional attachment to a product. Linking psychological research on ‘hedonic adaptation’ to our tendency to quickly discard functioning devices in favor of new ones, this project revisits work by Jonathan Chapman, Ed Van Hinte, and Donald Norman, translating some of their fundamental concepts into tangible and testable research artifacts.

Peeking the Everyday: Peekaboo Camera

Critical Changes

Designer: Yu-Ting Cheng – TU/e
Coaches: 
Mathias Funk, Rung Huei Liang, Lin-Lin Chen

Peeking the Everyday: Peekaboo Camera

How can we design for the moving target of privacy?

There is a tension in our lives between struggling against surveillance culture, and yet simultaneously welcoming it into our lives in the form of our phones, connected devices, and always-on products like Amazon’s Alexa. The Peekaboo camera is a hybrid design product and design probe developed as a research tool both to study people’s everyday lives and to explore the complexity of our relationship with privacy. As an “honest” surveillance camera, the Peekaboo is programmed to explore different behaviors along a spectrum of privacy-respecting options, such as only taking a picture of the home when it detects no humans are present, or raising a red warning flag when it’s about to take a picture. Where is the line between the value of data collection and giving space for privacy?

The Humane Datanome

Critical Changes

Designer: Rosa van Koningsbruggen – TU/e
Coach: 
Loe Feijs

The Humane Datanome

Who are we in relation to our data?

The historic Human Genome Project of fully sequencing human DNA was one of the most fundamental undertakings into understanding (and expanding) our human identity. With reference to this and ideas of the ‘selfish gene,’ the Humane Datanome project explores how we could gain insights into both ourselves and our position in complex data ecosystems by analyzing the data harvested from us in our day-to-day lives. Each Humane Datanome is a map of 22 websites visited (inspired by a chromosome map minus the male and female chromosomes), including information about cookies installed by these websites. What is your digital DNA? How does it intersect with your identity and indeed exert its own influence on you?