UNFOLD

Fostering Well-Being

Designers: Tim Velthuis, Jelle van Dijk – UTwente
Stakeholders: Karakter Centre for Child and Youth Psychiatry, Panton

With thanks to: Jiska, all participants, Heddeke Snoek, Mieke Boon, Joris Swaak and Michelle Temminghoff.

UNFOLD

How can we use databases available to us to design empowering interactions?

Many people on the autism spectrum experience anxieties about new or unknown places, which can have a big impact on their daily lives. Unfold is a concept that specifically targets young adults with agoraphobia to help them develop more independence in part by “previewing” unknown spaces through a connected device. By facilitating a more accessible way of exploring new places, Unfold motivates users to expand the area that they feel comfortable in. Design decisions were derived from an in-depth co-design process featuring multiple sessions with an autistic individual in collaboration with the design agency Panton and the child and youth psychiatric center Karakter.

See My Wrist

Fostering Well-Being

Designers: Stella Boess, Lorenzo Romagnoli, Dolma Tsundu – TU Delft
Stakeholders: Christiaan Uythoven (DIO agency), Dr. Gerald Kraan (Reinier de Graaf hospital)

See My Wrist

How can we support long-term medical routines?

Wrist instability is a long-term condition with a high level of adherence challenges for patients. In this project, a 10 month research investigation in collaboration with the orthopaedic surgeon Dr. Gerald Kraan and the digital behavior change agency DIO, gameful methods of wrist instability exercises were explored and tested with patients. The design is a set of wrist-worn sensors which, combined with online feedback, enable patients to both keep count of their exercise repetitions and know whether they are doing the exercises right, addressing two key challenges that emerged out of research with wrist instability patients.

Excelscope 2.0

Fostering Well-Being

Designers: Francesco de Fazio, Krishna Thiruvengadam Rajagopal, Gerianne Boer, Jan Sebastian van Ackeren, Linde de Jonge, Julieta Bolanos Arriola – TU Delft
Experts: Dr. Ir. J.C. Diehl (Design expert), Ir. T.E. Agbana (Optical expert), Dr. S. Patlan (Optical expert), Ing. F. van Pul (Medical Expert), Vinay Bhajantri (Design expert) and Karthik Mahadevan (Design expert), OSMD Optical Smart Malaria Diagnostics

Excelscope 2.0

Can low-cost edits to healthcare processes improve disease outcomes?

This low-cost malaria detection device reduces the workload of medical staff in developing countries while increasing the accuracy and decreasing the cost of diagnoses. Based on research performed by OSMD and TU Delft, the Excelscope automates analysis of blood samples for malaria, using its ball-lens to magnify blood samples, capturing multiple fields of view within a blood sample with its smartphone camera, and then utilizing an algorithm to accurately determine the number of parasites present. While other algorithms in existence often rely on professional microscopes, and while cheap microscopes usually require a component of manual labour, Excelscope is a uniquely integrated detection device, including a fully-automated 3-axis moving system.

FleXo: Flexible Exoskeleton for Therapeutic Touch

Fostering Well-Being

Kristin Neidlinger, Edwin Dertien, Kelly van Tol, Naveen Setty – UTwente

Coaches: Erwin Hoogerwoord, Arnav Mundkar, Suhaib Aslam
Partners: Wear Sustain, Personalised eHealth Technology programme, Responsible Design Grant, De Parabool

FleXo: Flexible Exoskeleton for Therapeutic Touch

Can technology-enabled healthcare become more intimate?

When introducing robot or automated interactions into healthcare, a missing component is often human touch, a connection that communicates both emotion and energy.  FleXo is a bioresponsive inflatable garment that facilitates the exchange of healing, therapeutic touch between a caregiver and a patient. This mediated touch is conveyed through FleXo’s silicone pneumatic elements for acupressure via visual and haptic feedback. The unique platform personalizes its inflatable actuation into a haptic language specific to the individual user. Throughout the experience of using FleXo, biosensing is employed to support and log emotional response and to continually adapt the soft exoskeleton’s behavior. As a wearable system, FLeXo supports both self-management and the use of mediated touch for wellbeing.

Mouthfeel

Fostering Well-Being

Margarita Kuzina – TU/e
Coach: Miguel Bruns

Mouthfeel

How can we support full sensory experiences for all?

Dysphagia patients are people who have difficulty swallowing and may have to live on limited or liquid diets, losing the pleasure of experiencing different food textures. With a 3D food printer, this project created a textured snack that dissolves into a liquid in the mouth. By focusing a high-tech design intervention on improving the small, human pleasure of ‘mouth feel,’ this installation puts forward a bold reframing of sensibilities for health and ability-centric designs. The 3D printing food investigation in Mouthfeel takes place as part of a larger study on production methods for shape and texture changing foods.

SRFACE

Fostering Well-Being

Timon Staal – TU Delft
Coaches: Toon Huysmans, Johan Molenbroek
Partner: 
SRFACE

SRFACE

How do new technologies impact manufacturing processes?

This project generated a new parametric approach for optimizing the fit and comfort of a wetsuit design using 3D anthropometric data. The current wetsuit industry relies heavily on 2D anthropometric measurements in creating a fit for wetsuit patterns. A time-consuming prototyping process is then used to optimize the pattern. With the increasing availability of technologies such as 3D scanning, designers are able to gain more insight into the complex surfaces of the human body. Using detailed 3D mannequins in combination with motion capture data, it is possible to design and assess both the static and dynamic fit of a wetsuit. This prototype was created to validate the potential of this 3D anthropometric approach and its reduction of physical prototyping.